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Thursday at SXSW

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Day and night, the music just keeps going and going at SXSW. ┬áSo what kind of music did Mo check out? Plenty! Read on…

Girl band 2

Girl Band 1

 

 

 

There isn’t a single girl in Girl Band, and these Dublin lads recall the Fall’s delivery and the Liars’ chaos at times, but definitely have an angular aggression all their own.

Chastity Belt 1Chastity 2

 

 

 

The ladies of Chastity Belt came from Seattle to play wry, dry, melodic indie for SXSW. They were both earnest and funny, and it was okay to chuckle along with the sincerity.

Mitski 1Mitski 2

Mitski has vocals both strong and delicate, like her songs, depending on what she’s up to at the moment. Her lyrics lean towards the dramatic, and occasionally her vocals do too, but it isn’t necessarily off putting. She just screams the way you wish you could sometimes.

 

 

VaccinesThe Vaccines came from the UK to bounce around a bit, and it was pretty fun. (That new track “Handsome “was WAY fun, actually.)

 

 

 

 

 

Viet CongThen came the noise… sorta. Canada’s Viet Cong, loud with a dramatic 80s flair, came onstage and the drummer proceeded to pound out his parts with one arms – the other was wrapped up and in a sling. No matter, though, it only brought out the vocals and when it came time to do their 11 minute opus, “Death,” they simply added the drummer from METZ for a 3 armed percussion attack. Successfully.

 

 

METZ

METZ really brought the noise, though. Loud, fast, totally in control. Rowdy, calculated, amazing. Ears were ringing, even the ones protected by earplugs.

 

 

 

 

 

My JeruAustin’s own My Jerusalem showcased a couple new rock numbers along with their melodic older stuff, punctuated by Jeff Klein’s dramatic howls. Horns, insane drumming, harmonies, moody Sergio Leone-esque guitar licks…always a trip to a dark and pretty place with these guys.

 

 

 

Leon BridgesAnd now for something completely different – Leon Bridges. Folks in the crowd played “name that era” with his sweet soul revue… 1953? 1957? 1961? Did it matter? He proved Sam Cooke will always be cool, and his voice and band backed up that soul is cool in any era.